A DALLIANCE WITH ATHEISM

Atheism, the Greek alpha privative applied to God

As if a letter could negate

The Word

But fashion has the apparent privative power

Belief is hard come by these days

In my day I’ve dallied with atheism

More as an academic posture, professional pose, poseur

Pretty important position to impertinently profess

To be unprofessional regarding the confession of God

As fashion

Quite unlike my younger years, when I didn’t know

In my gut

I didn’t know and I don’t know now, but believe

It’s hard to keep faith in mind and heart and life

In your gut

With a thinking mind, overthinking, ubermentation

Entertainment of doubts

It’s quite a thing to believe in things unseen

Unseemly, in fact, out of fashion

As if my mortal soul matters as does a hemline

Lifeline to eternity the believing mind, heart, life.

 

God whispers

 

Aethereal evidence

Evidence acquired through prior assent alone

Solipsistic criteria, a cry in the wilderness

That is this world, this world view, this zeitgeist, the spirit of this age

The Spirit and Words that give life

Life in a time and place in which belief is optional

Optimal

Words, Spirit, life, script for acting good, scripture

Inscribed on the heart, covenant, conformity to script

Information for theological formation not logical formulation

 

God whispers

 

We hear only with prior assent

Ascent out of that which is for this world

That which Is

That which makes this world

Faith in a doubt-filled world, the denial of the world, self-denial, other world

The Assassination of Aristotle

Philosophy and Religion used to provide guidance to us.  Now, psychology has taken over the role of guide for human behaviour.  It is a role that psychology is ill equipped to perform.

Plato taught us to examine the soul.  Aristotle taught us how logically to present an argument.  What is left of contemporary philosophy is only rhetoric, persuasion, and language analysis.  In the 20th century, philosophy turned logic into arithmetic and called it symbolic logic.  Then they said that logic is a closed system and does not relate to the world of experience.  That means philosophy can’t argue for the truth anymore, because you can’t argue at all.  Then philosophy said that there is no truth, only what I want.  So we are left not with arguments in search of the truth, we are left with persuading people to do what we want, what we want them to do.

Richard Rorty, one of our past great post-modern philosophers wouldn’t take an endowed chair in the philosophy department of the University of Virginia because he thought that philosophy had reasoned itself out of existence.  He had them design some sort of cultural analysis department that he taught in.

So we are left with expressing our feelings, accepting ourselves good or bad, and affirming ourselves, worthy or not.  Those are principles of psychology.  And as a consequence, we get “The Girl on the Train.”  A very long, uninteresting movie about the feelings of a girl, and her life–a life I didn’t much care about.

But I do care about people, and religion taught me to love others.  However, I have also been taught to love the good in people, to nurture it, and to bond with it.  Aristotle said that only virtuous people have the kind of temperament that can sustain friendship.  They are virtuous themselves and their psyche is not at odds with itself.  But philosophy has reasoned itself out of existence.  And religion’s influence is fading, has faded in society.  And we are left with The Girl on the Train.